JEFFERSON AIRPLANE - D.C.B.A.- 25


JEFFERSON AIRPLANE - 'D.C.B.A. - 25' (RCA Victor LSP-3766) March 1967

It's been five years this month since I started my website 'Flower Bomb Songs' and I'm certainly perplexed that I've never reviewed any music by one of my all time favourite groups, Jefferson Airplane. I'm not sure why I've never discussed their merits, maybe I was too concerned with obscurity.

Jefferson Airplane most definitely were not obscure during their breakthrough year of 1967. Their long player 'Surrealistic Pillow' peaked at #3 on the Billboard chart in USA and the album stayed there for 56 weeks. Not that I've ever been impressed by such commercial statistics, I'm more interested if the music within the grooves releases my mind to higher elevations and the Jefferson Airplane have been doing just that ever since I discovered their beautiful sounds in the early 80s.

The psych tinged folk-rock genius of 'D.C.B.A - 25' is an obvious highlight of 'Surrealistic Pillow'. Written by guitarist Paul Kantner, it's often overlooked whenever I read reviews and articles about the Airplane. Maybe the reason for this is that 'D.C.B.A. - 25' never graced the side of a 45. I honestly believe it would have made a killer single.

I always thought that 'D.C.B.A. - 25' was a very strange song title and the meaning didn't register with me until I read the liners of the RCA stereo CD re-issue of 'Surrealistic Pillow'. Here, it was explained that Kantner named his melodic folk-rocker in reference to the songs chord progression and the numerical part '25' is the designation chemist Albert Hofmann assigned to his best known chemical discovery LSD-25.

The song was recorded at Studio B in RCA's studio in Hollywood during November 1966.

Comments

  1. A most wonderful track from a fantastic LP...that for some reason I listened to it few times lately ... released pretty much around this time 45 years ago!

    I'm sure that too often while looking for 'undiscovered masterpecies' we forget about albums that are true classics and that also enjoyed huge charts success...different times indeed!

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  2. A fantastic track from a fantastic album, DCBA-25 is often overlooked
    (as is "How Do You Feel" written by
    the tragic Tom Mastin). The run of
    albums "Surrealistic Pillow" through to "Volunteers" is only matched by the Byrds run of "Mr. Tambourine Man" through to "Notorious Byrd Bros.".A great choice Colin.

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  3. used the first lines of this song in my High School year book blurb in 1982.

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  4. All true except Paul was not the lead guitarist, Jorma was. RIP, Paul.

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