STAINED GLASS - Lady In Lace - The Capitol Singles

 
STAINED GLASS - 'Lady In Lace'/'Soap And Turkey' (Capitol P 2178) April 1968

Following the expiry of their RCA Victor contract Stained Glass signed to another major label, namely Capitol Records and went through a personnel change with rhythm guitarist Roger Hedge departing. The group were now a three piece with Jim McPherson (vocals and bass), Dennis Carrasco (drums) and Bob Rominger (lead guitar).

The first Capitol 45 was the pop psycher 'Lady In Lace', another Phil Stumpo (pseudonym for Jim McPherson) penned tune. The song had a blissful sweeping baroque arrangement with hit potential, very similar in style to those early lush Left Banke classics. Sadly, the record failed to dent the national chart.

The flip 'Soap And Turkey' is an excursion into psychedelia with some tasty raga-esque lead guitar from Bob Rominger. This song appeared on their first album 'Crazy Horse Roads' but 'Lady In Lace' is non LP.




 
STAINED GLASS - 'Fahrenheit'/'Twiddle My Thumb' (Capitol P 2372) 1969

Both of these songs appear on the album 'Crazy Horse Roads', the single was probably released to promote this long player. 'Fahrenheit' sees the band develop a more standard late 60s rock sound. The flip 'Twiddle My Thumb' is downer folk, stripped down to the bones apart from a yearning vocal from Jim McPherson and some pleasant orchestration.


 
STAINED GLASS - 'Gettin' On's Gettin' Rough'/'The Necromancer' (Capitol P 2521) 1969

Sometime in early 1969 Bob Rominger had been replaced by Tom Bryant on lead guitar and Jim McPherson became the sole songwriter of the band. Both of these songs were part of their second album 'Aurora' released in June 1969.

'Gettin' On's Gettin' Rough' is laid back rock with a punchy production from Voyle Gilmore (fresh from his work with Frank Sinatra and The Kingston Trio)....The biggest thing I have noticed with Stained Glass from 1969 is that Jim McPherson's vocals had changed to a soft and wavery delivery and remind me of Jack Bruce or Barry Gibb.

'The Necromancer' is a blues rocker and is obviously heavily influenced by Cream. The bass is loud and heavy and Tom Bryant's lead guitar runs are inventive. It's a real grower and it's a shame the band didn't continue on this kind of trip. Could have been interesting.

Comments